Eatwith Team Recipe: Maya’s Shakshuka

Eggs aren’t only for breakfast. This one-skillet dish is perfect at any time of the day.

While traditionally served for breakfast with a side of challah or pita, this Israeli dish will satisfy your hunger at any time of the day. Shakshuka is a dish that’s made with poached eggs that simmer on a bed of tomato sauce and veggies. All you need is a skillet and a few simple ingredients and you’re ready to get cooking.

 

Shakshuka
Maya’s shakshuka

Eatwith Private Events Manager Maya in Israel recently led some of our team in a virtual Shakshuka cooking class. Her recipe was so delicious, we wanted to share it with our community. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do!

Eatwith team Shakshuka class
The Eatwith team making shakshuka

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Water
  • 1 Onion
  • 1 Red bell pepper
  • 2 Tomatoes
  • 1 Red/green chili pepper (optional)
  • 4 Cloves garlic
  • 4-5 Sprigs fresh parsley
  • 3 tbsp. Oil
  • 1 cup tomato paste
  • 1 tsp. Sweet paprika
  • ½ tsp Coriander
  • 1 tsp. Sugar
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 4 eggs

Instructions

  1. Cut all the vegetables
    • Peel the onion and cut in half and start slicing in half-crescent shapes. 
      *Pro-tip: Put the onion in the fridge an hour before cutting to prevent the tears!
    • Mince the garlic (cut in thin slices).
    • Chop bell peppers into thin strips. 
    • Cut tomato into eighths.
    • Chop red/green chili.
  2. Add 1 tbs. olive oil into a pan. Once the pan is heated, add onions. Allow it to simmer until caramelized and golden.
  3. Add tomatoes, bell pepper and chili pepper (if using).
  4. Let vegetables heat up, then add garlic.
  5. Allow vegetable mixture to simmer until all ingredients have caramelized. Then add the paprika.
  6. Sprinkle in salt and coriander.
  7. At a high temperature, mix all ingredients together for one minute.
  8. Add tomato paste. Stir for about two minutes until all ingredients are combined.
  9. Using the tomato paste can add 1/2 cup of water to the skillet. Stir until sauce becomes rich and flowy. (Add water as needed until the sauce has reached the correct consistency.)
  10. Once the sauce is ready, add sugar.
  11. Allow the dish to cook for 10 minutes until the sauce is concentrated.
  12. While the dish cooks, prepare your eggs. Create small indents in the mixture to add the eggs.
  13. One by one, crack an egg into a small bowl then pour the egg into the indents in the skillet.
  14. Once you’ve added the eggs, sprinkle the chopped parsley over the mixture.
  15. Cover the skillet. Continue to cook on low heat until eggs are cooked to your preference.

Allow the dish to cool slightly. Serve the shakshuka the skillet, family-style. Dip pieces challah or any bread of your choice into the shakshuka and enjoy!

 

 

Made the dish using this recipe? We’d love to see! Snap a pic and tag @eatwith on social media

9 Comments
  1. The ingredient list and steps don’t match up, can someone revise this? Steps call for tomato paste and coriander, but not listed in ingredients. Ingredients has way more oil and crushed tomatoes, but steps don’t call for it. I can still use this as a base and adjust to my needs, but curious what the final recipe was.

  2. Hi, love this dish and I am always looking for new variations. You include ingredients in your written directions that are not included in your ingredient list. Coriander and tomato paste.

  3. The recipe calls for tomato paste in the instructions but it is not listed in the ingredients list. Chopped canned tomatoes are but not used in the recipe. Which is correct?

  4. The ingredients list does not include coriander, tomato paste.. may be a typo and you meant cumin where you wrote coriander.
    Thanks

  5. This recipe looks great. What type of oil do you recommend ? And should one mince the garlic or just cut it in slices ? And about how long do you continue cooking once the eggs have been added ?

    Thank you, hope you are well,
    Sue

  6. Chakchouka(Algeria) This dish, with many variations, is a popular breakfast in North Africa, especially in Algeria and Tunisia. Most recipes include the eggs, but they can actually be left out if you like. Jewish immigrants from the Maghreb- North Africa- have made this a popular breakfast dish in Palestine too.

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